Showing posts tagged chris hoy

SIR CHRIS HOY FOR SCIENCE IN SPORT


A promo video for Hoy’s newest sponsor, Science In Sport.
Tags: chris hoy,
SIR CHRIS HOY: THIS MUCH I KNOW 

I wish I could ride bikes for the rest of my life but those aches and pains are starting to hurt. Cycling is low-impact, which is why people cycle into their 70s or 80s, but track cycling means hard gym work and crashes.

My wife Sarra was instrumental to my success. When I was training, she took care of everything. She would make me dinner and always understood when I had to go to bed early or couldn’t walk around the shops. I hope to repay her soon.

I am quite pernickity about cleaning. Just at home, though. You wouldn’t know it if you saw my hotel room with all my kit everywhere. I’m always tidying the bills and paperwork in the kitchen. I’m a bit of a neat freak.

It’s weird how you get used to being recognised. When I’m in Australia or America and somebody says: “Are you Chris Hoy?” I’ll have a picture taken, sign an autograph and carry on. It’s only afterwards you think: “That was surreal.”

Travelling brings you closer to home. I was born and raised in Edinburgh and it’s when you leave, travel and look around the world that you realise how beautiful it is.

Scottish people don’t take themselves too seriously. I think you have to be like that when you’re from a place where the weather is bad. Plus, we wear kilts. They’re very distinctive.

My legs are my favourite body part. They’ve won me medals, so I have a lot to thank them for. Unlike my back, which gives me grief.

To see my name on the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome in Glasgow means a lot. Whether I compete there at the 2014 Commonwealth Games is purely down to my body. I don’t want to turn up for the tracksuit. I’ll only compete if I can win a medal for my country.

I’m mad about cars. The obsession started when I saw Colin McRae win the 1995 World Rally Championship. I now have a Lotus and go on track days at Oulton Park. The mix of excitement and fear reminds me of my first days in the velodrome.

Playing rugby as a kid improved my work ethic. I was quite small and didn’t really grow until I was 15. When you get a pasting, you learn to get tough and work harder just to keep up.

It’s amazing what pressure can do. At the Olympic Village in London you could actually see the atmosphere change. At first it was quiet and people were on a mission. By the second week it was a party zone.

My family just want me to be safe. My mum and my wife both say they just want me to cross the line on my bike and not fall on the ground. Only when I see videos of their reactions do I realise what they go through when I race.

Portrait ripped from Replaceface (found by Hernian).  Text stolen from The Guardian.
SIR CHRIS HOY: THIS MUCH I KNOW 

I wish I could ride bikes for the rest of my life but those aches and pains are starting to hurt. Cycling is low-impact, which is why people cycle into their 70s or 80s, but track cycling means hard gym work and crashes.

My wife Sarra was instrumental to my success. When I was training, she took care of everything. She would make me dinner and always understood when I had to go to bed early or couldn’t walk around the shops. I hope to repay her soon.

I am quite pernickity about cleaning. Just at home, though. You wouldn’t know it if you saw my hotel room with all my kit everywhere. I’m always tidying the bills and paperwork in the kitchen. I’m a bit of a neat freak.

It’s weird how you get used to being recognised. When I’m in Australia or America and somebody says: “Are you Chris Hoy?” I’ll have a picture taken, sign an autograph and carry on. It’s only afterwards you think: “That was surreal.”

Travelling brings you closer to home. I was born and raised in Edinburgh and it’s when you leave, travel and look around the world that you realise how beautiful it is.

Scottish people don’t take themselves too seriously. I think you have to be like that when you’re from a place where the weather is bad. Plus, we wear kilts. They’re very distinctive.

My legs are my favourite body part. They’ve won me medals, so I have a lot to thank them for. Unlike my back, which gives me grief.

To see my name on the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome in Glasgow means a lot. Whether I compete there at the 2014 Commonwealth Games is purely down to my body. I don’t want to turn up for the tracksuit. I’ll only compete if I can win a medal for my country.

I’m mad about cars. The obsession started when I saw Colin McRae win the 1995 World Rally Championship. I now have a Lotus and go on track days at Oulton Park. The mix of excitement and fear reminds me of my first days in the velodrome.

Playing rugby as a kid improved my work ethic. I was quite small and didn’t really grow until I was 15. When you get a pasting, you learn to get tough and work harder just to keep up.

It’s amazing what pressure can do. At the Olympic Village in London you could actually see the atmosphere change. At first it was quiet and people were on a mission. By the second week it was a party zone.

My family just want me to be safe. My mum and my wife both say they just want me to cross the line on my bike and not fall on the ground. Only when I see videos of their reactions do I realise what they go through when I race.

Portrait ripped from Replaceface (found by Hernian).  Text stolen from The Guardian.

SIR CHRIS HOY: THIS MUCH I KNOW


I wish I could ride bikes for the rest of my life but those aches and pains are starting to hurt. Cycling is low-impact, which is why people cycle into their 70s or 80s, but track cycling means hard gym work and crashes.

My wife Sarra was instrumental to my success. When I was training, she took care of everything. She would make me dinner and always understood when I had to go to bed early or couldn’t walk around the shops. I hope to repay her soon.

I am quite pernickity about cleaning. Just at home, though. You wouldn’t know it if you saw my hotel room with all my kit everywhere. I’m always tidying the bills and paperwork in the kitchen. I’m a bit of a neat freak.

It’s weird how you get used to being recognised. When I’m in Australia or America and somebody says: “Are you Chris Hoy?” I’ll have a picture taken, sign an autograph and carry on. It’s only afterwards you think: “That was surreal.”

Travelling brings you closer to home. I was born and raised in Edinburgh and it’s when you leave, travel and look around the world that you realise how beautiful it is.

Scottish people don’t take themselves too seriously. I think you have to be like that when you’re from a place where the weather is bad. Plus, we wear kilts. They’re very distinctive.

My legs are my favourite body part. They’ve won me medals, so I have a lot to thank them for. Unlike my back, which gives me grief.

To see my name on the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome in Glasgow means a lot. Whether I compete there at the 2014 Commonwealth Games is purely down to my body. I don’t want to turn up for the tracksuit. I’ll only compete if I can win a medal for my country.

I’m mad about cars. The obsession started when I saw Colin McRae win the 1995 World Rally Championship. I now have a Lotus and go on track days at Oulton Park. The mix of excitement and fear reminds me of my first days in the velodrome.

Playing rugby as a kid improved my work ethic. I was quite small and didn’t really grow until I was 15. When you get a pasting, you learn to get tough and work harder just to keep up.

It’s amazing what pressure can do. At the Olympic Village in London you could actually see the atmosphere change. At first it was quiet and people were on a mission. By the second week it was a party zone.

My family just want me to be safe. My mum and my wife both say they just want me to cross the line on my bike and not fall on the ground. Only when I see videos of their reactions do I realise what they go through when I race.

Portrait ripped from Replaceface (found by Hernian). Text stolen from The Guardian.
Tags: chris hoy,
4 Photos

OLYMPICS: MEN’S KEIRIN


While one of Great Britain’s track megastars faded away in second place, the other went out with a huge bang. Sir Chris Hoy owned the men’s Keirin event earlier today at the London Olympic Velodrome and became Britain’s most successful Olympian of all time, decorated with 6 Gold medals.

In typical Hoy fashion, it didn’t look like our Keirin World Champion would take the win until the last fraction of a second leading up to the finishline. After advancing through the tournament with ease, Hoy began the final heat in the third position behind the derny. As the derny pulled off, the race between some of the fastest racers in the world starts off. With to laps to go, Hoy pulls to the front of the field and creates a small gap. The gap doesn’t last long as Malaysia’s Azizulhasni Awang sticks to Hoy’s wheel. The bell rings to signify the the last lap and Germany’s Maximilian Levy comes around the field to come up next to Hoy’s bike. On the back straight, it looks as if Hoy is running out of gas and Levy might have him beat. But Levy has a longer distance to travel on the outside of turns three and four and Hoy takes advantage of that. He pulls hard and strong through the corners and slingshots into the front straight to take a demanding lead towards the finishline. Another amazing win for Sir Chris Hoy as the stadium’s crowd roars.

Hoy has said before that he will be retiring after the London Olympics but it’s really up in the air. A couple years ago Hoy had to drop out of competing in the Commonwealth Games at New Delhi in order to chase down Olympic qualification points at the European Championships. Hoy laments this decision as the Commonwealth Games provide a rare opportunity to represent his native country of Scotland in an international competition. The 2014 Commonwealth Games will take place in Glasgow at the newly built Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome. The competition is still a couple years away so Hoy has not decided yet whether or not to sign up. We’ll see.

GOLD — Great Britain (Sir Chris Hoy)
SILVER — Germany (Maximilian Levy)
BRONZE (tied) — Netherlands (Teun Mulder) and New Zealand (Simon van Velthooven)

Full results available HERE. Watch the final heat at NBC Olympics. Photos courtesy of The Guardian.
4 Photos

OLYMPICS: MEN’S TEAM SPRINT


With Chris Hoy, Jason Kenny and their newest team mate 19-year old Philip Hindes, Great Britain’s Men’s Team Sprint could not have gone better. While Victoria Pendleton and Jess Varnish had some trouble with their Women’s Team Sprint, relegating them to 8th place — the sold-out stadium crowd was all cheers for Hoy and company.

In the qualifying round, Hoy, Kenny and Hindes broke the Olympic record. Then the top eight teams advanced to the semi-final round. Hindes’ tire slipped a bit on the start so he crashed out in the first turn to get a restart. During the rerun, the Brits broke the World Record with a time of 42.747 seconds (previously set by Germany last year at 42.914 seconds).

The remaining teams advanced to the finals: Germany v. Australia for Bronze and Great Britain v. France for Gold. I expected France to be the biggest threat for Great Britain in this event but at this point, it was obvious that The Brits were in much better shape. In the final round, Hoy and his team once again smashed the World Record with a time of 42.6 seconds while Germany beat Australia for bronze. This is the fifth Olympic Gold medal for Sir Chris Hoy and the second for Jason Kenny. Here are your medals:

GOLD - Great Britain (Chris Hoy / Jason Kenny / Philip Hindes)
SILVER - France (Gregory Baugé / Michael D’Almeida / Kevin Sireau)
BRONZE - Germany (Rene Enders / Robert Forstemann / Maximillian Levy)

Full results are HERE. Photos courtesy of The Guardian.

THE WINNING MOVE OF THE DECADE


I know it’s old news now but…

"I thought I’ll give it a go and I breathed in, shut my eyes and went through the gap." Sir Chris Hoy, Keirin World Champion. Seriously did that with his eyes closed. I love Hoy’s parents’ reaction in the upper left corner of this video. Priceless.

UPDATE: Check out Alfred’s YouTube Playlist for more highlights from last weekend’s World Championships in Melbourne. Full results are up at Tissot Timing.
STELLA McCARTNEY x ADIDAS GB OLYMPIC KIT 

Team GB revealed their 2012 Olympics kit today and it looks swanky!  Stay tuned for details on how to get one of your own — no, you don’t have to be on Team GB, although that wouldn’t hurt.

See more details at Cycling Weekly.
STELLA McCARTNEY x ADIDAS GB OLYMPIC KIT 

Team GB revealed their 2012 Olympics kit today and it looks swanky!  Stay tuned for details on how to get one of your own — no, you don’t have to be on Team GB, although that wouldn’t hurt.

See more details at Cycling Weekly.

STELLA McCARTNEY x ADIDAS GB OLYMPIC KIT


Team GB revealed their 2012 Olympics kit today and it looks swanky! Stay tuned for details on how to get one of your own — no, you don’t have to be on Team GB, although that wouldn’t hurt.

See more details at Cycling Weekly.
4 Photos

REVOLUTION 36 


Last weekend was the 36th event in Manchester Velodrome’s Revolution Series and it looks like a huge crowd turned out to see some true track racing. Head over to British Cycling’s Flickr to see the rest of the set.

For highlights from the night, check out this video from Cyclevox.
WORLD CUP ASTANA: HOY v. DMITRIEV 

Still not too much media coming out of last weekend’s UCI World Cup event in Kazakhstan but this shot pretty much sums it up.  Sir Chris Hoy nips Russian challenger Denis Dimitriev to the line in the Sprint final.

Photo found on Domestique.

P.S. Anyone who looks at this photo and calls it even, take a look at where the front wheels are in contact with the track surface in relation to the finish line.  It may be just a few millimeters but that’s how races are won at the velodrome.
WORLD CUP ASTANA: HOY v. DMITRIEV 

Still not too much media coming out of last weekend’s UCI World Cup event in Kazakhstan but this shot pretty much sums it up.  Sir Chris Hoy nips Russian challenger Denis Dimitriev to the line in the Sprint final.

Photo found on Domestique.

P.S. Anyone who looks at this photo and calls it even, take a look at where the front wheels are in contact with the track surface in relation to the finish line.  It may be just a few millimeters but that’s how races are won at the velodrome.

WORLD CUP ASTANA: HOY v. DMITRIEV


Still not too much media coming out of last weekend’s UCI World Cup event in Kazakhstan but this shot pretty much sums it up. Sir Chris Hoy nips Russian challenger Denis Dimitriev to the line in the Sprint final.

Photo found on Domestique.

P.S. Anyone who looks at this photo and calls it even, take a look at where the front wheels are in contact with the track surface in relation to the finish line. It may be just a few millimeters but that’s how races are won at the velodrome.
The general rule of thumb is, if you’re not hurting you’re probably not doing it right.

Sir Chris Hoy in an article he wrote for The Telegraph about the training year ahead of him before the 2012 London Olympics.



Read the full article at The Telegraph.


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